jon's blog

Leverage your Excel process data in eVSM (part 2)

In part 1 I talked about a very simple way to move data from Excel into eVSM.  This method is very limited because none of the cycle times or demands or any other process data gets imported, just the name of the step/block.

Excel Data Input

In this part, I'm going to talk about a feature that's been in beta testing at eVSM for several years, but never exposed to users.  This feature allows you to input data in Excel that will add new centers to the map, including any variable data you have for them.  It also lets you modify data for existing centers on your map.

Leverage your Excel process data in eVSM (part 1)

Excel is a powerhouse tool for collecting and analyzing data, which is why pretty much every company uses it.  That's the reason we at eVSM have relied on Excel for so many of the lean tools we create: our users already know Excel and use it regularly (and we also require that it's installed on your PC).

So I just wanted to talk a little bit about how we've tried to make building maps faster and easier for you, taking advantage of Excel.  In this part, I'll cover a simple tool for building process steps from Excel, but in subsequent posts I'll talk about how you can use process data for building maps, and how you can get eVSM map data out of Visio and into Excel.

Easy Map Capture - Sketch

Since eVSM v6, we have provided Sketch stencils to go along with our Quick stencils.

Draw supply networks on a world map

In eVSM v10 we introduced a new supply network mapping stencil, which lets you visualize and play “what-if” games to help improve the cost and lead time aspects of the network.

One really interesting thing about the stencil is it was designed for drawing over a world map:

That world map is available for use in any quick stencil or wizard, or any map you want to draw i

The easy way to capture your wall map electronically

Value stream mapping is a process that should be done as a team.  You can't get a realistic sense of how a value stream works without involving the people who work in that value stream.  The de-facto standard way of making value stream maps is by having a group of people work together to form a consensus on how things actually work, and make that into a map.

So once your team have come up with a value stream map (on post-it notes, whiteboard, butcher paper, wherever..) it typically helps to store your map electronically.  The simplest reason is to make the map available and easier to find than if it remains strictly on paper.

Adding your own data variables

Over the years (and versions of eVSM) the concept of putting data fields on a value stream map hasn't changed much.

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